1. 15:50 2nd Sep 2014

    Notes: 6434

    Reblogged from laughlikethunder

    Tags: EXACTLY

    But I guess ultimately what scares me about marriage is where do you find this person? You know a lot of times, most successful relationships, people meet through work, school, mutual friends. But what’s most interesting to me is when people just meet in life, just randomly. You know, I have a friend, he got married, I asked him like “Hey, uh, where’d you meet your wife?” He was like “I was leaving Bed, Bath & Beyond. I was looking for my car - I drive a gray Prius. I saw a different gray Prius, I thought it was mine, I walked up to it, I realized I had the wrong car, but I bumped into Carol, we started talking, that was that”. That’s unbelievable. Think about all the random factors that had to come together to make this one moment possible - this one moment that changed these two people’s entire lives: First off, this guy has to live in this particular town. Then he has to get a gray Prius. Then he has to need to go to Bed, Bath & Beyond. Then he has to go to that particular Bed, Bath & Beyond. Then there has to be another guy who also lives in town, also drives a gray Prius, also needs to go to Bed, Bath & Beyond, also goes to that particular Bed, Bath & Beyond at around the same time. Then they have to both park somewhat near each other, my friend has to leave before the other guy leaves, see the wrong Prius, think it’s his, walk up to it. Then the woman, Carol, needs to be near the wrong gray Prius for a million other random reasons. They bump into each other, they start talking, their entire lives are changed. That’s the most amazing and terrifying thing about life. It is, cause the amazing thing is that at any moment, any one of us can have that moment that totally changes our lives. You could be leaving the show tonight, bump into someone… it could change your life. You don’t know, that could happen. The terrifying thing is… what if we’re all supposed to be at Bed Bath & Beyond right now?
    —  Aziz Ansari, Buried Alive (via psych-facts)
     
  2. 21:33 29th Aug 2014

    Notes: 88685

    Reblogged from reveiller-mon-ame

    hatfullofsky:

    You think you’re going to be hip and teen forever and then suddenly you find yourself drinking red wine and playing board games and lusting after men with beards 

    (Source: geogonpal)

     
  3. 21:19

    Notes: 14005

    Reblogged from fuckyeahyoga

     
  4. 21:25 28th Aug 2014

    Notes: 26

    Reblogged from albino-r2d2

    (Source: hellomarial)

     
  5. 21:28 24th Aug 2014

    Notes: 78334

    Reblogged from ruinedchildhood

    ruinedchildhood:

no chill

    ruinedchildhood:

    no chill

    (Source: sailorgoons)

     
  6. 21:13

    Notes: 60161

    Reblogged from thisisterranova

    I’ll never punish my daughter for saying no.

    The first time it comes out of her mouth, I’ll smile gleefully. As she repeats “No! No! No!” I’ll laugh, overjoyed. At a young age, she’ll have mastered a wonderful skill. A skill I’m still trying to learn. I know I’ll have to teach her that she has to eat her vegetables, and she has to take a nap. But “No” is not wrong. It is not disobedience.

    1. She will know her feelings are valid.
    2. She will know that when I no longer guide her, she still has a right to refuse.

    The first time a boy pulls her hair after she says no, and the teacher tells her “boys will be boys,” we will go to her together, and explain that my daughter’s body is not a public amenity. That boy isn’t teasing her because he likes her, he is harassing her because it is allowed. I will not reinforce that opinion. If my son can understand that “no means no” so can everyone else’s.

    3. She owes no one her silence, her time, or her cooperation.

    The first time she tells a teacher, “No, that is wrong,” and proceeds to correct his public school, biased rhetoric, I’ll revel in the fact that she knows her history; that she knows our history. The first time she tells me “No” with the purpose and authority that each adult is entitled, I will stop. I will apologize. I will listen.

    4. She is entitled to her feelings and her space. I, even a a parent, have no right to violate them.
    5. No one has a right to violate them.

    The first time my mother questions why I won’t make her kiss my great aunt at Christmas, I’ll explain that her space isn’t mine to control. That she gains nothing but self doubt when she is forced into unwanted affection. I’ll explain that “no” is a complete sentence. When the rest of my family questions why she is not made to wear a dress to our reunion dinner. I will explain that her expression is her own. It provides no growth to force her into unnecessary and unwanted situation.

    6. She is entitled to her expression.

    When my daughter leaves my home, and learns that the world is not as open, caring, and supportive as her mother, she will be prepared. She will know that she can return if she wishes, that the real world can wait. She will not want to. She will not need to. I will have prepared her, as much as I can, for a world that will try to push her down at every turn.

    7. She is her own person. She is complete as she is.

    I will never punish my daughter for saying no. I want “No” to be a familiar friend. I never want her to feel that she cannot say it. She will know how to call on “No” whenever it is needed, or wanted.

    — Lessons I Will Teach, Because the World Will Not — Y.S. (via poetryinspiredbyyou)
     
  7. 00:19

    Notes: 1722

    Reblogged from laughlikethunder

    Creating a life that reflects your values and satisfies your soul is a rare achievement. In a culture that relentlessly promotes avarice and excess as the good life, a person happy doing his own work is usually considered an eccentric, if not a subversive. Ambition is only understood if it’s to rise to the top of some imaginary ladder of success… To invent your own life’s meaning is not easy, but it’s still allowed, and I think you’ll be happier for the trouble.
    — Bill Watterson (via maddierose)

    (Source: tetatet)

     
  8. 14:59 22nd Aug 2014

    Notes: 69664

    Reblogged from spiritualseeker

    As a child I never heard one woman say to me, “I love my body.” Not my mother, my elder sister, my best friend. No one woman has ever said, “I am so proud of my body.” So I make sure to say it to Mia, because a positive physical outlook has to start at an early age.
    — Kate Winslet, speaking about her daughter.  (via thatkindofwoman)

    (Source: wrists)

     
  9. 10:11

    Notes: 223976

    Reblogged from laughlikethunder

    (Source: katewinslet)

     
  10. 21:03 18th Aug 2014

    Notes: 308674

    Reblogged from ruinedchildhood

    (Source: deneuveing)